tools?

Technical and Repair Discussions
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Novice Typer
Novice Typer
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Joined: Tue Mar 28, 2017 8:57 pm
Location: Maplewood
PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 9:15 pm
Hello, Iam new to the sport and will be getting my srf 2 in a few weeks. In the meantime I would like to get a few things together. Would any of you have a suggestion on which standard size tools I need to work on the car? I have plenty of metric tools but no standard. so which socket sizes and wrench sizes should i buy? i would like to avoid buying complete sets if i only nee 1/3 of it. also i prefer socketsfor using a torque wrench wherever possible. thanks a lot in advance.
Sven
Edit 05-31-20 and later:

After a few years running and prepping the Gen2 and lately converting the srf to gen3 I could come up with following tools (I will add to the list whenever convenient). Also I usually buy Snapon, Stahlwille, Gedore, Hazet or whatever McMaster Carr has. LCC tools taught me lessons and I do not buy these.

- small battery driven impact drill (Bosch) with 1/4 adapter to run 1/4 sockets. I bought that one at Snapon. I usually do use the 7/16 or 11mm socket for the 1/4-28 or 1/4-20 bolts
- a 1/4 drive torque wrench which goes between 2-25Nm, I have the Gedore one. I torque 95% of the bolts that I tighten. Tables for what torque should be used are available in engineering books or maybe even in the internet. For most dry assembled bolts I use a friction coefficient of 0.18-0.20. The tables usually go to 80% yield which is pretty conservative. Remember to add the friction torque of the nylon insert nuts if you want to be super accurate.


- a 3/8 inch torque wrench with 8-80Nm or whatever that is in english
- a 1/2 inch torque wrench with 50-250ft*lbs of torque, that is especially for the drive shaft nuts and wheel nuts. Besides other things.
- a long 1/2 inch breaker bar (22 inch) to open the drive shaft nuts.

- wrenches 3/8 break line, 1/4, 8mm, 1/2, 7/16, 12-19mm, 9/16, 11/16, 19/32, 7/8, 13/16, 22mm, 15/16
- 2x Channel lock adj wrenches 1 1/2 for AN fittings

- Sockets:
1/4 and 3/8 bit adapter for 1/4 bits.
1/4 inch bits sets internal hex metric and standard
1/4 inch drive: sizes of sockets are 3/16 to 1/4 brand is wera, 5/16 deep for hose clamps
3/8 inch drive: 3/8 to 3/4 brand is wera , 10" extension, internal hex 5,6,8mm, Stahlwille ratchet
1/2 inch: 10-24mm set, 19mm deep, 15/16 deep, 30mm socket deep


- 1/2 impact wrench, battery driven Milwaukee 150Nm- I recommend a bigger one if you buy one.
- small Bosch drill to drill holes if required.
- a set of drill bits and a 90 degree deburr drill
- a rivet nut puller- I got a simple one from McMaster Carr together with many 1/4-28 river nuts.
- Axle popper or whatever the name is. To get the drive shafts out of the transmission.
- Oetiker pliers for the CV boot clamps
- Grease Gun, OTC, in case your car has a purpose for that
- Long nose pliers- Keiba
- Side cutter Keiba for Tyraps
- Side cutter pliers for piano wire, Knipex
- Cobra pliers, Knipex
- Soldering iron and heat gun for electric work
- Radkitplusa, vacuum filler- worked excellent on my bead seat and coolant fill.
- Selfmade steering column clamp to lock steering when doing the alignment
- Alignment bars and strings
- Lift jack 22" operating length brand is Ranger
- Line+ cross Laser Bosch to setup the scales
- Intercomp scales and levelers
- Longacre camber and caster level with adapter to hold onto the wheel.
- 48 inch level or optional a straight bar to lay onto the level to check the ride height
- Mitutoyo caliper 0.05mm accuracy
- Metal hand saw
- rivet plier
- Angle grinder, Metabo 4 1/2"
- air grinder 1/4 collet with burrs

Further on, maybe not required but at some time somewhat important.
- 4HP air compressor, mostly for painting.
- Hoist in the attic to pull the engine out.
- TIG welder Dynasty DX280 cps including cooler
- Press for getting wheel bearing replaced. (It typically takes about 7-10k lbs) I do that at work in our fabshop. A lathe next to it is helpful when making pieces to get the bearing out and in again
- Tire changer and balancer- same here, I do that at work.
- optional things to do fiberglass work and do spray painting if you like that work.

that list is probably incomplete and you might be ok with less, some people might even have more things- you can't have too many proper tools. ;)
Last edited by Fuchsroehre on Tue Jun 02, 2020 7:30 pm, edited 3 times in total.
svenmueller_77
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Chassis:
595
PostPosted: Tue Mar 28, 2017 10:21 pm
Other than a 13/16", you'll want a complete SAE wrench set from at least 7/16" through 15/16" of wrenches (you want to double up on a couple like 1/2 & 9/16 - I find the ratcheting sets work well for tight spaces.) Same range for SAE sockets. Pretty much everything to do with the suspension is SAE, except brake parts (caliper pins/bracket). Engine side is mostly metric except for mounts to the chassis. There's one special tool I recommend to get to the 11/16" inner suspension rod end nuts that are buried into front suspension mounts in the front (and helpful in the rear as well, as well as a metric star socket for the caliper brackets (don't recall the number.)

Metric range is pretty standard 7/8/10/13/17/19.
Bob Breton - SRF 51 - San Francisco Region
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 29, 2017 1:04 pm
A 30MM 1/2-inch drive socket, which is what you'll need to check that the rear hub axle nuts are staying in proper torque range -- roughly 160 foot-pounds. That nut can, from time to time, back off a bit and make high speed stability kinda hinky.
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 29, 2017 3:02 pm
One tool I was told to purchase by one of the more experienced drivers was a portable vacuum cleaner. I did not appreciate why at the time until I ran Laguna Seca. Went a little "off the preferred line" and beached it then had to remove a few buckets of sand. The next race weekend went agricultural at Thunderhill and had to remove a few buckets of sod. Highly recommended, you won't realize how handy they can be....
Jerry Aplass SRF #204
San Francisco Region
"Straights are for fast cars. Turns are for fast drivers." - Colin McRae
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 29, 2017 5:25 pm
I love the user name... one of my favorite corners/complexes in the world to drive! :) Welcome to the class!
____________
Bay 12, please.
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 29, 2017 5:32 pm
A jack with low clearance and some stands about 6" high (enough to keep the tires off the ground).
Dave Harriman
"It looks crazy, I understand. But, we only live once and I am going to give it a good try." - Alex Zanardi
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Novice Typer
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Location: Maplewood
PostPosted: Wed Mar 29, 2017 8:50 pm
Thank you so much for all the info. I really appreciate it and wish you all a good season.
Sven.
svenmueller_77
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 30, 2017 9:06 am
Oh, and this may seem out of left field, but trust me on this: 2x4 wood blocks, eight of them, a foot to 18 inches long. I won't go into all the uses here. You'll find out soon enough.
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 30, 2017 9:57 am
Best thing I've bought is an 18V (I use Ryobi and it works great) impact gun (right term?). You will be taking wheels on and off and it works on all other bolts, axle nuts, etc.
It also shares batteries with my drill, impact driver (not needed on car), air compressor, etc. Love it.
____________
Bay 12, please.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 30, 2017 11:19 am
Racer X wrote:Best thing I've bought is an 18V (I use Ryobi and it works great) impact gun (right term?). You will be taking wheels on and off and it works on all other bolts, axle nuts, etc.
It also shares batteries with my drill, impact driver (not needed on car), air compressor, etc. Love it.


I'll back this up. (I have Bosch.) Get a good one that has trigger-progressive speed so that you can ease the lug nuts on without cross-threading. Cheaper guns are just on/off and you'll need to start them by hand to be safe.
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